15638
27 Aug 14 at 12 pm

(Source: flashate, via rainbowcute)

mistresselanvital:

djferreira224:

Wave


🌛🌕🌜
 9337
24 Aug 14 at 11 pm

(Source: ricciolos, via rejective)

makemestfu:

EVERYTHING RELATE
 21447
24 Aug 14 at 11 pm

stunningpicture:

A proper tribute to a man who inspired me to be as weird and mad as he was. R.I.P The One Robin Williams

Robin Williams

(via shootinupthestars)

stunningpicture:

A proper tribute to a man who inspired me to be as weird and mad as he was. R.I.P The One Robin Williams


Robin Williams
 16682
24 Aug 14 at 11 pm

eluciidate:

flowers at the farmers market

(via shootinupthestars)

 258
24 Aug 14 at 11 pm

youngjusticer:

Check out that cutie buried in Arcanine’s fur. :}

Arcanine and Vulpix, by Adorael.

(via beastofparadise)

youngjusticer:

Check out that cutie buried in Arcanine’s fur. :}
Arcanine and Vulpix, by Adorael.
 105
24 Aug 14 at 11 pm

thekimonogallery:

Photography by ajpscs on Flickr. 

 Image taken on August 30, 2009.  Jingumae 1 Chome, Tokyo, Tokyo Prefecture, Japan

Shishi (or Jishi) is translated as “lion” but it can also refer to a deer or dog with magical properties and the power to repel evil spirits. A pair of shishi traditionally stand guard outside the gates of Japanese Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples

Shishi-mai or “Lion Dance,” is performed while wearing the headdress or various masks. Shishi masks take on many forms, some with horns, others looking like a dog, a deer, or a lion.

Shishi-mai dances became widespread in Japan thereafter as both a form of festival entertainment and as a means to ward off evil spirits, to pray for peace, bountiful harvests, and good health.
www.onmarkproductions.com/html/buddhism.shtml

(Source: Flickr / ajpscs, via beastofparadise)

thekimonogallery:

Photography by ajpscs on Flickr. 
 Image taken on August 30, 2009.  Jingumae 1 Chome, Tokyo, Tokyo Prefecture, Japan
Shishi (or Jishi) is translated as “lion” but it can also refer to a deer or dog with magical properties and the power to repel evil spirits. A pair of shishi traditionally stand guard outside the gates of Japanese Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples
Shishi-mai or “Lion Dance,” is performed while wearing the headdress or various masks. Shishi masks take on many forms, some with horns, others looking like a dog, a deer, or a lion.

Shishi-mai dances became widespread in Japan thereafter as both a form of festival entertainment and as a means to ward off evil spirits, to pray for peace, bountiful harvests, and good health.www.onmarkproductions.com/html/buddhism.shtml